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Creative Writing

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❶Writers also develop their skills by studying masterworks in a variety of traditional and contemporary genres.

Creative Writing

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Students will spend one week with each member of the faculty. Faculty members will teach their specialty, offering an introductory class in prose fiction, poetry, memoir, or dramatic writing. By the end of the month, every student will have had a class in every genre. Electives meet four afternoons each week. These workshops provide students with an oppurtunity to go deep in a particular genre or approach to writing.

Students will choose their elective during the departmental orientation. CSSSA Creative Writers have the rare opportunity to participate in lively discussions regarding the lives and creative strategies of nationally recognized writers.

On Saturday mornings the Creative Writing department gathers to hear students to share work created during the prior week. Faculty members describe the writing exercises, their purposes, and the problems and discoveries made by the writers. Every week students will work together on group projects. These might include creating a play, writing group poems, or working together to tell stories from their lives. Creative Writing students gain experience planning, editing, laying out, and publishing a collection of original work.

The annual Literary Anthology is distributed on the final day of the session. Every week students will have the opportunity to sign up for office hours with the Creative Writing faculty. Hilary is a poet and scholar of English literature with an emphasis on Shakespeare, the Victorians, and the multi-cultural tradition of fairy tales.

Few sources available today offer writing teachers such succinct, practice-based help—which is one reason why 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing was the winner of the Association of Education Publishers Distinguished Achievement Award for Instructional Materials.

Write Now Newsletter Get more great resources on teaching and writing delivered to your inbox every month by subscribing to our Write Now Newsletter.

Since NWP does not promote a single approach to teaching writing, readers will benefit from a variety of eclectic, classroom-tested techniques. These ideas originated as full-length articles in NWP publications a link to the full article accompanies each idea below. Debbie Rotkow, a co-director of the Coastal Georgia Writing Project , makes use of the real-life circumstances of her first grade students to help them compose writing that, in Frank Smith's words, is "natural and purposeful.

When a child comes to school with a fresh haircut or a tattered book bag, these events can inspire a poem. When Michael rode his bike without training wheels for the first time, this occasion provided a worthwhile topic to write about. A new baby in a family, a lost tooth, and the death of one student's father were the playful or serious inspirations for student writing.

We became a community. When high school teacher Karen Murar and college instructor Elaine Ware, teacher-consultants with the Western Pennsylvania Writing Project , discovered students were scheduled to read the August Wilson play Fences at the same time, they set up email communication between students to allow some "teacherless talk" about the text. Rather than typical teacher-led discussion, the project fostered independent conversation between students. Formal classroom discussion of the play did not occur until students had completed all email correspondence.

Though teachers were not involved in student online dialogues, the conversations evidenced the same reading strategies promoted in teacher-led discussion, including predication, clarification, interpretation, and others. Impressions from Electronic Literacy Conversations. Diane Waff, co-director of the Philadelphia Writing Project , taught in an urban school where boys outnumbered girls four to one in her classroom.

The situation left girls feeling overwhelmed, according to Waff, and their "voices faded into the background, overpowered by more aggressive male voices. Determined not to ignore this unhealthy situation, Waff urged students to face the problem head-on, asking them to write about gender-based problems in their journals. She then introduced literature that considered relationships between the sexes, focusing on themes of romance, love, and marriage.

In the beginning there was a great dissonance between male and female responses. According to Waff, "Girls focused on feelings; boys focused on sex, money, and the fleeting nature of romantic attachment. Inviting Discourse on Gender and Power. Jan Matsuoka, a teacher-consultant with the Bay Area Writing Project California , describes a revision conference she held with a third grade English language learner named Sandee, who had written about a recent trip to Los Angeles.

I made a small frame out of a piece of paper and placed it down on one of her drawings — a sketch she had made of a visit with her grandmother. Eileen Simmons, a teacher-consultant with the Oklahoma State University Writing Project , knows that the more relevant new words are to students' lives, the more likely they are to take hold.

In her high school classroom, she uses a form of the children's ABC book as a community-building project. For each letter of the alphabet, the students find an appropriately descriptive word for themselves.

Students elaborate on the word by writing sentences and creating an illustration. In the process, they make extensive use of the dictionary and thesaurus. One student describes her personality as sometimes "caustic," illustrating the word with a photograph of a burning car in a war zone.

Her caption explains that she understands the hurt her "burning" sarcastic remarks can generate. John Levine, a teacher-consultant with the Bay Area Writing Project California , helps his college freshmen integrate the ideas of several writers into a single analytical essay by asking them to create a dialogue among those writers. He tells his students, for instance, "imagine you are the moderator of a panel discussion on the topic these writers are discussing.

Consider the three writers and construct a dialogue among the four 'voices' the three essayists plus you. Levine tells students to format the dialogue as though it were a script. The essay follows from this preparation. Writing Dialogue in the College Composition Classroom. The following is a group poem created by second grade students of Michelle Fleer, a teacher-consultant with the Dakota Writing Project South Dakota. Underwater Crabs crawl patiently along the ocean floor searching for prey.

Fish soundlessly weave their way through slippery seaweed Whales whisper to others as they slide through the salty water. And silent waves wash into a dark cave where an octopus is sleeping. Fleer helped her students get started by finding a familiar topic. In this case her students had been studying sea life. She asked them to brainstorm language related to the sea, allowing them time to list appropriate nouns, verbs, and adjectives. The students then used these words to create phrases and used the phrases to produce the poem itself.

As a group, students put together words in ways Fleer didn't believe many of them could have done if they were working on their own, and after creating several group poems, some students felt confident enough to work alone. Douglas James Joyce, a teacher-consultant with the Denver Writing Project , makes use of what he calls "metawriting" in his college writing classes. He sees metawriting writing about writing as a way to help students reduce errors in their academic prose.

Joyce explains one metawriting strategy: After reading each essay, he selects one error that occurs frequently in a student's work and points out each instance in which the error is made. He instructs the student to write a one page essay, comparing and contrasting three sources that provide guidance on the established use of that particular convention, making sure a variety of sources are available.

Glorianne Bradshaw, a teacher-consultant with the Red River Valley Writing Project North Dakota , decided to make use of experiences from her own life when teaching her first-graders how to write.

For example, on an overhead transparency she shows a sketch of herself stirring cookie batter while on vacation. She writes the phrase "made cookies" under the sketch.

Then she asks students to help her write a sentence about this. She writes the words who , where , and when. Using these words as prompts, she and the students construct the sentence, "I made cookies in the kitchen in the morning. Next, each student returns to the sketch he or she has made of a summer vacation activity and, with her help, answers the same questions answered for Bradshaw's drawing.

Then she asks them, "Tell me more. Do the cookies have chocolate chips? Does the pizza have pepperoni? Rather than taking away creativity, Bradshaw believes this kind of structure gives students a helpful format for creativity.

Stephanie Wilder found that the grades she gave her high school students were getting in the way of their progress. The weaker students stopped trying. Other students relied on grades as the only standard by which they judged their own work.

She continued to comment on papers, encourage revision, and urge students to meet with her for conferences. But she waited to grade the papers. It took a while for students to stop leafing to the ends of their papers in search of a grade, and there was some grumbling from students who had always received excellent grades.

But she believes that because she was less quick to judge their work, students were better able to evaluate their efforts themselves. Erin Pirnot Ciccone, teacher-consultant with the Pennsylvania Writing and Literature Project , found a way to make more productive the "Monday morning gab fest" she used as a warm-up with her fifth grade students. She conceived of "Headline News. After the headlines had been posted, students had a chance to guess the stories behind them.

The writers then told the stories behind their headlines. As each student had only three minutes to talk, they needed to make decisions about what was important and to clarify details as they proceeded.

They began to rely on suspense and "purposeful ambiguity" to hold listeners' interest. It may be a motivating question or instruction which helps to catch the idea and purpose of the assignment and thus helps to generate a writing plan.

Writing prompts come in different shapes and sizes. Funny and amusing prompts are given to students when they have to share some creative stories with each other.

Here are some interesting writing prompts for high schools students:. All of the mentioned prompts are aimed to evoke writing inspiration. On the other hand, creative writing prompts help students broaden their outlook and improve thinking. It is important for students to be assigned tricky tasks which would make them think, therefore, writing prompts should sometimes be challenging and even controversial.

If essay writing is still complicated task for you, check out our cheap essay writing services. Indeed, ideas can be very interesting and even some of them unusual. In my opinion, need to start with writing prompts that are more related to the individual personally.

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Read on for some creative writing exercises for high school aged students. Creative Writing Exercises for Middle School; Creative Writing Competitions for High School Students;.

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Home → Blog → 30 Creative Writing Prompts for High School 30 Creative Writing Prompts for High School. Tweet. March 17, There are situations when one gets stuck in the middle of the writing process. On the other hand, creative writing prompts help students broaden their outlook and improve thinking. It is important for students to.

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In this post, we'll outline how you can take the initiative to pursue multiple creative writing opportunities both in and out of high school. Here are some creative writing prompts for high school students, or upper-level middle school kids. These prompts focus on dialogue creation, voice, and plot.

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Creative Writing, Page 3 Make Beliefs Comix Students create comic strips online. This tool is great for prewriting, responding to reading, creative writing, vocabulary words, ESL, and tickets out. Sacred Cows for High School Creative Writing Students This unit uses stories and information about animals to discuss various themes that deal. High school upperclassmen can develop their non-fiction, fiction and poetry writing skills in our tuition-free, online Creative Writing class.