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❶However, after I explained that I intended to try something different, the mood changed. When students bring their items back to class, ask each to describe why the item is not like him or her.

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Some students came upon intriguing and significant historical problems as they researched and developed their narratives. Zhiyun wrote about the Trail of Tears, the Indian removal that took place in the s. One problem she encountered was that many of the first-hand accounts she found were very biased.

As I started to research, I realized that most of the first-hand accounts came from an American point that was severely slanted against the Indians.

I realized that there were very few accounts from white men sympathetic to the Indians. Thus, my narrator was born. He was to be a soldier directly involved in the removals but with a pro-Cherokee point of view. Here the narrator, who is awaiting his own hanging, explains to the audience his reasons for killing two American soldiers in an attempt to save an Indian family from a savage beating:.

On our way there, I uncomfortably noticed the surrounding chaotic round-ups; screaming mothers begged troops to let them find their children while bayonets ruthlessly slashed and jabbed all unmercifully.

That night I happened to encounter a pitiful Cherokee family of four being struck and prodded with bayonets by soldiers. Around lunch time, Scott called for the troops to gather for an execution. An Indian attempted to escape with his family, but they were captured by pursuing troops; the Indian and his two sons were immediately sentenced to death.

The nastiest surprise came when their fellow Cherokee were forcefully made to enlist in the firing squad. Some soldiers started to roar with laughter at this humiliation.

I, however, was too petrified to even move. Helplessly, I watched as the Indians were executed one by one to the wailing and lamenting of their friends and family. While the voice of the narrator is not as prominent in this example as in some of the other papers, the depth of research is clear. In addition to historical facts, Zhiyun found information that documented the human side of this tragedy.

One of her sources described how an Indian was executed for trying to escape, and she used that incident as the catalyst that drove her narrator to a breaking point. She also learned that the soldiers used bayonets if the Cherokee did not follow orders.

While some papers, unlike these two, fell short of including significant facts, most students successfully developed a narrator for their written accounts. Many commented that they had gone through a series of ideas for their narrator. As they considered the possibilities, they discovered that the facts they chose were dependent upon who their narrator was. Relating history through a fictionalized account meant they had to analyze the information using unconventional methods.

For example, twelve students wrote about Columbine. As I read each paper on this incident, I noted the information that each had included related directly to the student's choice of narrator. Helen explains her process this way: This was especially evident when I read Lynn and Kate's papers. Lynn's narrator was near Mr. Sander's room so her focus was his murder.

The narrator, hidden in the janitor's closet, witnessed the events unfold through a crack in the door. She described the killing as the teacher tried to intervene, but her details stopped when the shooters entered the library doors:.

When the gun made another awful holler, Mr. Sanders hit the ground. The boys entered the library and I ran out of the closet, I tried to stop the blood, but he was gone. Closing his eyes, I ran toward the doors.

Two final gunshots sounded and it was over. Unlike Lynn's narrator, who ended her story at the library doors, Kate's narrator was located in the library. This account began when a student frantically entered the room screaming at them to hide because some kids had guns in the hallway:. I was reading through my study guide when a girl dashing through the big library door caught my attention. She was screaming hysterically.

Between gasps she forced out words. Kate's narrator goes on to relate the series of events which led to Cassie Bernall's murder. Both of the students had chosen the same topic, yet their papers were vastly different. This occurred repeatedly with the papers written on this topic. I was curious to know how this might be related to the research they conducted.

When I examined the notes, however, I found that most students basically had the same information, so I concluded that they had to sift through their facts and evaluate them to determine their relevance to their narrator's point of view. Without realizing it, these students were engaged in higher-order thinking. Other students used very clever writing techniques that allowed their character to learn and share information he or she had not personally witnessed.

Some writers used conversations heard later to flesh out what the character could not have known as the event unfolded. Other characters relied on live radio or television reports to fill in the gaps. In almost all cases the students blended the information in a believable way that didn't interfere with the progression of the story or make the reader think, "Oh, they tried to stick a fact in here.

What my freshmen had previously not been able to accomplish in a traditional research paper—blending information seamlessly—they proved capable of doing with this form of writing. Allison explained, "Instead of being forced to write down fact after fact, you incorporated the facts in, so it's like a fact scavenger hunt. I was pleasantly surprised to discover other learning outcomes as well.

Grace commented that she was sure she would remember the information she gathered. Shelly commented that she learned more because she had to actually put herself there. One young man, Joe, was both proud and moved by what he had accomplished: It brought tears to my eyes. It's impossible for students to cheat, since the Internet can't give them a paper using their specific narrator. So students have no viable way to cut and paste others' work and pass it off as their own.

What a breath of fresh air! I cannot leave my readers with the impression that everything my students wrote was wonderful. Programs Greater Toronto Language School offers three core programs to choose from. Our Blog In English. Oct 08, No Comments. Practice English in the Real World Education. In this picture, our English students are practicing speaking near our school with native Oct 07, No Comments. How do you improve your English at school?

Unforgettable, stunning, and definitely a must see experience. Jun 27, No Comments. Caffe Demetre has always been a favourite amongst the teachers and students here at Greater Jun 22, No Comments. May 30, No Comments. Register or Contact Us. At the end of the activity, tell students to write on the card the name of the student who best matches the description.

Then have students share their results. How many students guessed correctly? Patricia McHugh, John W. Set up a circle of chairs with one less chair than the number of students in the class. Play music as the students circle around the chairs. When the music stops, the students must sit in a seat. Unlike the traditional game, the person without a seat is not out.

Instead, someone must make room for that person. Then remove another seat and start the music again. The kids end up on one another's laps and sharing chairs! You can play this game outside, and you can end it whenever you wish. Afterward, stress the teamwork and cooperation the game took, and how students needed to accept one another to be successful.

Reinforce that idea by repeating this game throughout the year. Danielle Weston, Willard School, Sanford, Maine Hands-On Activity Have students begin this activity by listing at least 25 words that describe them and the things they like. No sentences allowed, just words!

Then ask each student to use a dark pen to trace the pattern of his or her hand with the fingers spread apart. Provide another sheet of paper that the student can place on top of the tracing.

Because the tracing was done with a dark pen, the outline should be visible on the sheet below. Direct students to use the outlines as guides and to write their words around it. Provide students a variety of different colored pencils or markers to use as they write.

Then invite students to share their work with the class. They might cut out the hand outlines and mount them on construction paper so you can display the hands for open house. Challenge each parent to identify his or her child's hand. Then provide each student with five different-colored paper strips. Have each student write a different talent on separate paper strips, then create a mini paper chain with the strips by linking the five talents together. As students complete their mini chains, use extra strips of paper to link the mini chains together to create one long class chain.

Have students stand and hold the growing chain as you link the pieces together. Once the entire chain is constructed and linked, lead a discussion about what the chain demonstrates -- for example, all the students have talents; all the students have things they do well; together, the students have many talents; if they work together, classmates can accomplish anything; the class is stronger when students work together than when individual students work on their own.

Hang the chain in the room as a constant reminder to students of the talents they possess and the benefits of teamwork. Your school librarian might have a discard pile you can draw from. Invite students to search through the magazines for pictures, words, or anything else that might be used to describe them. Then use an overhead projector or another source of bright light to create a silhouette of each student's profile; have each student sit in front of the light source as you or another student traces the outline of the silhouette on a sheet of by inch paper taped to the wall.

Have students cut out their silhouettes, then fill them with a collage of pictures and words that express their identity. Then give each student an opportunity to share his or her silhouette with the group and talk about why he or she chose some of the elements in the collage.

Post the silhouettes to create a sense of "our homeroom. You can use such cards to gather other information too, such as school schedule, why the student signed up for the class, whether the student has a part-time job, and whether he or she has access to the Internet at home.

As a final bit of information, ask the student to write a headline that best describes him or her! This headline might be a quote, a familiar expression, or anything else.

When students finish filling out the cards, give a little quiz. Then read aloud the headlines one at a time. Ask students to write the name of the person they think each headline best describes. Who got the highest score?

It seems as if parents are contacted only if there is a problem with students. At the end of each grading period, use the home address information to send a postcard to a handful of parents to inform them about how well their child is doing. This might take a little time, but it is greatly appreciated! Pop Quiz Ahead of time, write a series of getting-to-know-you questions on slips of paper -- one question to a slip.

You can repeat some of the questions. Then fold up the slips, and tuck each slip inside a different balloon. Blow up the balloons. Give each student a balloon, and let students take turns popping their balloons and answering the questions inside. Contributor Unknown Fact or Fib? This is a good activity for determining your students' note-taking abilities. Tell students that you are going to share some information about yourself. They'll learn about some of your background, hobbies, and interests from the second oral "biography" that you will present.

Suggest that students take notes; as you speak, they should record what they think are the most important facts you share. When you finish your presentation, tell students that you are going to tell five things about yourself. Four of your statements should tell things that are true and that were part of your presentation; one of the five statements is a total fib.

This activity is most fun if some of the true facts are some of the most surprising things about you and if the "fib" sounds like something that could very well be true.

Tell students they may refer to their notes to tell which statement is the fib. Next, invite each student to create a biography and a list of five statements -- four facts and one fib -- about himself or herself.

Then provide each student a chance to present the second oral biography and to test the others' note-taking abilities by presenting his or her own "fact or fib quiz. Mitzi Geffen Circular Fact or Fib? Here's a variation on the previous activity: Organize students into two groups of equal size. One group forms a circle equally spaced around the perimeter of the classroom. There will be quite a bit of space between students.

The other group of students forms a circle inside the first circle; each student faces one of the students in the first group.

Give the facing pairs of students two minutes to share their second oral "biographies. After each pair completes the activity, the students on the inside circle move clockwise to face the next student in the outer circle. Students in the outer circle remain stationary throughout the activity. When all students have had an opportunity to share their biographies with one another, ask students to take turns each sharing facts and fibs with the class.

The other students refer to their notes or try to recall which fact is really a fib. Contributor Unknown People Poems Have each child use the letters in his or her name to create an acrostic poem.

Tell students they must include words that tell something about themselves -- for example, something they like to do or a personality or physical trait. Invite students to share their poems with the class. This activity is a fun one that enables you to learn how your students view themselves. Allow older students to use a dictionary or thesaurus. You might also vary the number of words for each letter, according to the students' grade levels.

Bill Laubenberg Another Poetic Introduction. Ask students to use the form below to create poems that describe them.

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Course Overview. The High School Research Writing Course will explore the research process from the prewriting stage to the revision stage. Students will plan and develop one research report, practicing and mastering each step of the research process before moving on to the next step.

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Research Packet Table of Contents Your student will begin the senior research paper next week in his/her English class. This research “% of high school students let someone else copy their work in , and % did so in ”-- The State of Americans: This Generation and the Next. High School Research Paper Topics You Shouldn’t Pass By Posted on November 7, by EssayShark Writing research papers is a wearying process, and even more so when you don’t have a specified topic.

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Whether you are writing a college paper or high school essay you need to start with a good topic. accessible foundation – an excellent topic. This is important for both high school and college students. Research paper topics don’t just fall from the sky, and finding something that’s truly unique and interesting is not an easy feet. Questioz (Questioz | Home) is an international online journal of high school research, dedicated to the cause of promoting research and the spirit of intellectual, academic enquiry among high school students, globally. We believe that, given the opportunity, high school students can contribute in very meaningful ways to the global academic.