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Analysis of Poem "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost

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❶At the end of the third stanza and in the fourth, however, the speaker resumes his initial tone of sorrow and regret. Lately, I've been reviewing my own life and the choices I've made.

"The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost

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Nevertheless, for such a seemingly simple poem, it has been subject to very different interpretations of how the speaker feels about his situation and how the reader is to view the speaker. Frost wrote the poem in the first person, which raises the question of whether the speaker is the poet himself or a persona, a character created for the purposes of the poem. According to the Lawrance Thompson biography, Robert Frost: The Years of Triumph , Frost would often introduce the poem in public readings by saying that the speaker was based on his Welsh friend Edward Thomas.

In the first stanza of the poem, the speaker, while walking on an autumn day in a forest where the leaves have changed to yellow, must choose between two paths that head in different directions.

He regrets that he cannot follow both roads, but since that is not possible, he pauses for a long while to consider his choice. In the first stanza and the beginning of the second, one road seems preferable; however, by the beginning of the third stanza he has decided that the paths are roughly equivalent. Later in the third stanza, he tries to cheer himself up by reassuring himself that he will return someday and walk the other road.

At the end of the third stanza and in the fourth, however, the speaker resumes his initial tone of sorrow and regret. He realizes that he probably will never return to walk the alternate path, and in the fourth stanza he considers how the choice he must make now will look to him in the future. He also thinks that he will later realize what a large difference this choice has made in his life.

Two important details suggest that the speaker believes that he will later regret having followed his chosen road: That is to say, the speaker solemnly uses the metaphor of the two roads to say one thing, while Frost humorously uses the speaker as a metaphor to say something very different. Even in taking the second path, though, he reconsiders and sees them both as equally worn and equally covered with leaves.

The speaker first grasps at small details in the landscape to help him choose the better path, then seems to have the common sense to see that the two roads are essentially equivalent, but finally allows his overanxious imagination to run away with him. Robert Frost and the Challenge of Darwin. University of Michigan Press, This sets the mood of indecision that characterizes the language of the poem. Clearly, this is to emphasize that both roads appeared untouched, not having been tarnished by the foot of a previous traveler.

The poet is the first to encounter this dilemma. The point of view is of the traveler, who, walking along a single path, encounters a fork in the road and stops to contemplate which path he should follow. The first road is described as bending into the undergrowth. The second road is described as "just as fair," though it was "grassy and wanted wear.

So, again, the roads are equalized. Yet, as if to confuse the reader, Frost writes in the final stanza:. With that, we are left to wonder how Frost knew the road he took was the one less traveled by.

But Frost likely left this ambiguity on purpose so that the reader would not focus so much on condition of the road, and, instead, focus on the fact that he chose a road any road, whether it was that which was less traveled by or not , and that, as a result, he has seen a change in his life.

To comment on this article, you must sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account. Appreciate the visit and comment. Frost, formal and full of mischief, giving the reader so many choices. My English Literature teacher gave a different interpretation.

His interpretation is both roads are fundamentally the same. When he is older he will lie to young people about how his choice of the hard road made a significant difference when the choice was irrelevant. Such an interpretation makes it an amusing poem. Yes, Frost is a great poet of traditional form and often leaves us wanting more.

Juicy pickings his lines are full of Thanks always for your good work, appreciate your detailed analyses. Frost is such a beacon. Some poetry can be helpful to us in our real lives, as a guide and comfort, as a catalyst.

The Road Not Taken is a classic of form and content. Lately, I've been reviewing my own life and the choices I've made. I've, consistently taken "the road less traveled". Sometimes, it seems, that life and circumstances left me little choice. This poem, as well as other poems you've chosen to analyze, speak directly to me. I'm sure most people would say the same.

Words are open to interpretation. That's very interesting that he wrote it based on his walks with a friend. I didn't know the history behind the poem; thank you for sharing. One does wonder at times, on life's journey, what taking a different road might have led to. However, I personally have found that you can't spend too much time dwelling on that, because life moves forward, not backwards.

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For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: Robert Frost and "The Road Not Taken" "The Road Not Taken" is an ambiguous poem that allows the reader to think about choices in life, whether to go with the mainstream or go it alone.

Most common speech is a combination of iambs and anapaests, so Frost chose his lines to reflect this: Two roads di verged in a yell ow wood , And sor ry I could not tra vel both This simple looking poem, mostly monosyllabic, has a traditional rhyme scheme of ABAAB which helps keep the lines tight, whilst the use of enjambment where one line runs into the next with no punctuation keeps the sense flowing.

Frost also mentions the color black in the lines: And both the morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no steps had trodden black.

Yet, as if to confuse the reader, Frost writes in the final stanza: I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference. Please read the analysis in my article. Thank you, Andrew, for bringing the heart of poetry to me. This website uses cookies As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. This is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.

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TEXT TO ANALYSIS ESSAY- The Road Not Taken By Robert Frost Posted on October 21, by Ekrmaul Haque The poem, “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost states that in life we come upon many decisions, and there are .

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The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Essay Words | 2 Pages. The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost "The Road Not Taken" Everyone is a traveler, choosing the roads to follow on the map of the continuous journey of life. There is never a straight path that leaves someone with a single direction to head.

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- The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost In Robert Frost's "The Road Not Taken," (reprinted in Laurence Perrine and Thomas R. Arp, Sound and Senses, 8th ed. [San Diego: Harcourt, ] 23) the speaker stands in the woods, considering a fork in the road. The Road Not Taken analysis essaysOne of Frost's commonest subjects is the choice the poet is faced with two roads, two ideas, two possibilities of action. "The Road Not Taken" deals with the choice between two roads, and with the results of the choice which the poet makes. It raise.

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“The Road Not Taken” is a poem in which we learn that sometimes we have to let fate take the lead. With the use of literary devices and tone we learn that this poem is trying to show us that life is a combination between decisions and fate. Poetry analysis- the road not taken The poem entitled "the road not taken" is a narrative poem written by American poet Robert Frost, which consists of four stanzas and twenty lines in total. In terms of literary devices, the first line of the poem creates beautiful imagery, "two roads diverged in a yellow wood".